Maritime Nets:

ATTENTION: If you know of any nets that are not on this page, or any that need changes please let me know.

I would like to keep this page as up to date as possible. Thanks.

Click here to view the NSARA Link System. Thanks to Bill Elliott for the PowerPoint presentation.

VHF / UHF Nets

VHF - UHF Nets
 
 
 
The Captain's Net 
  Daily
  0730H
  VE1YAR
  146.730-
 IRG Weather Net
 Daily
 0730H
  IRG Network
 
 Greenwood ARC Net
 Monday
 1930H
VE1WN
 147.240+
WestCumb ARC Monday Night 2M Net 
 Monday
2000H
  VE1WRC
  147.285
2 Meter Wake-Up Net
 Mon-Fri
 0730H
 MAVCOM
 
 Lunenburg County EMO Net
 Tuesday
1900H
  VE1VL VE1LUN
VE1LCA
147.090+ 147.330+ 146.835-
  IRG Tuesday Night Net
  Tuesday
  2100H
  IRG Network
 
IRLP Trans Canada Net
 Wednesday
 1200H
 MAVCOM
 
  Miramichi Area VHF Net
  Wednesday
  2100H
  IRG Network
 
  IRG ECOMM Net
  Thursday
  2100H
  IRG Network
 
Yarmouth ARC Saturday Night 2M Net
 Saturday
 2000H
 VE1YAR
 146.730-
 Moncton UHF Net
  Sunday
  2000H
 
  449.325
Take 15 Net
 Sunday
 2030H
 VE1PSR
 147.270+
Truro ARC Newbie Roundtable Net 
  Sunday
  2100H
  VE1HAR
  147.210+
IRG Sunday Night Net
 Sunday
 2100H
 IRG Network
  text
Moncton & Area 2 Meter Net 
  Sunday
  2100H
 VE9TCR
  147.345+

HF Nets

Click to edit table header
 
 
 
White Cane Social Hour
  Daily
  1800H
  3.770MHz.
Maritime Net
  Daily
  1900H
  3.750MHz.
Newfoundland & Labrador   Evening Traffic Net
 Daily
  1900H NL Time
  3.740MHz. or
  7.040MHz.
PL Net
 Mon-Sat
  0900H
  3.735MHz.
 Red Cross Weekly Net
 Thursday
  1830H
  3.675MHz.
Old Timers Net
 Sunday
  0800H
  3.750MHz.
 Exercise Handshake
 Last Tuesday Each Month
  1900H
 3.675MHz.
 Cod Jigger Net
 Daily
 0930H NL Time
 3.740MHz. or
 7.040MHz.

Professional Loafers Net: Monday - Saturday 9am

Scheduled Net Controllers:
The Professional Loafers Net
April 2017


Scheduled Net Controllers:

Monday - VE1RV - Roger
Tuesday - VE1KRE - Keith
Wednesday - VE1XYL - Charlotte
Thursday - VE1ALG - Bill
Friday - VE1EEE - Joe   
Saturday - VA1DM - Doc
Spare - VE1DI - Bob
Spare - VE9YA - Dave
Spare - VE1WJT - Willie

Total Check-ins for the PL Net for May, 2017 were 476
Average per Net: 18

The Professional Loafers Net History

Information on the very beginning of the Professional Loafers Net is sketchy. I'm told that it was started by Eddy Allen - VE1BEW. He thought there should be a net on 80 metres in the mornings for Maritimers and I’m told he had only one check-in on the first net, a friend - VE1AQO. Shortly after VE1IS - Lou joined the net as a net control. The net started on 3.760 and moved to it’s present frequency of 3.735 sometime in the 90's due to interference from some out-of-the Maritimes stations using the same frequency.
A few of the net controllers from the late 90's that i remember were VE1IS - Lou, VY2AAM - Phil, VE1BLC - Adolph, VE1BEW - Linda, VE1EEE - Joe, VE1AKP - Bob, VE1CFC - Claude. And many others.
VE1GA - Leigh says "My earliest recollections of this date back to the mid 1960’s. In the 1965-69 period a group of VE1’s gathered in 80M in the mid morning weekday hours. One in particular whom I knew very well was VE1GX, Charlie Girvan (SK). Charlie’s typical QSO group would have included VE1LG, Fred Bath (SK), VE1GB, Rev. Harry Bird (SK), VE1IC, Barak Smith (SK), among others. I had been an active SWL for a few years prior to obtaining my licence (VE1AUC) in 1966. Being in middle school and high school during that time period I did not get to "tune-in" to the gang. However, in QSO’s with them both on the air and eyeball to eyeball they did refer to their gathering on the air as the "Professional Loafers".

So it seems the PL Net has been around for over 45 years.
If anyone has anymore info on the PL net It would be much appreciated if you would share it with us.
Thanks. VE1KRE - Keith
 

From Bill VE1MR Oct.23rd:

 Wake-Up Net and Nets in General

I have received may comments about linked nets and people not being heard when they try to call in.
This is caused by several things.
#1 net controllers quite often do not leave enough space for the system to drop and have people check in.
#2 people checking in are way too fast to key up and start speaking.
#3 net controllers do not say who they have heard but generally just call in the checkers in order, so until they call for checkers again a person trying to check in has no idea if they were heard.

There are several ways to help reduce these problems.
#1 net controllers should leave enough time after hearing checkers to let the system completely drop for a few seconds.
     Remember it may take up to 2 seconds once a checker keys up for your local repeater to key up.
     When you think you have heard all the checkers for a call in then repeat back the calls you heard and ask if there were others.
     This may still not get every one but will at least give those stepped on another chance .
     Read back the list of checkers you have heard and begin calling them in, this will let any more who tried know they were not heard
so they can try the next time.

#2 People checking in must key up for a second or so before they begin to speak - see my comment above about system lag times.
     Remember in many cases even if you have keyed up someone else on another part of the system may key up and block you out from the net control station.
     Space yourself out during the check in period - you do not have to be the first check in.
     When there is space wait for the link drop beep (there is one on most repeaters but not all) before keying up.

#3  for net controllers see the comments in #1 and also think about where you are hearing check ins from.
     If you are hearing check ins from only one section of the system maybe you should try calling for checkers from a particular section of the system.

Net controllers should learn how the link system is configured.
Run the Power Point presentation on the Maritime Amateur site that I did, it may not have everything in it but does have a lot of useful information.
If that Power Point presentation does not answer your question please let me know and I can probably prepare something aimed particularly at net controllers.

An example is if you are hearing only people checking in from the North and East you may want to ask particularly for check ins West of Halifax.
Or if you do not hear people checking in from the East ask for checkers from the East of Truro.
There are several other areas that can be isolated as well depending on where someone else checks in from.

As a net controller you should be able to keep things going smoothly.
Remember there is lots of time available in most cases so space your calls for check ins out leaving lots of time for people to check in.

For those checking in I cannot emphasize enough the need to leave some time between keying up and speaking.
Wait and listen, try to get your call into a break in the action and do not be in too much of a hurry.

I hope this will reach the right people.

Thank you for reading and if I can clarify things better let me know.

73 - Bill Elliott, VE1MR