Atlantic News
 

From George VY2GF Jun.14th:

Billy Budge (VE1AAO) wrote a book “Memoirs of a Lightkeeper's Son” (ISBN-13: 978-1551097695) which chronicles the five years he spent on St. Paul island where his father, Fred, was the lightkeeper. In 1960 the family moved to the Port Bickerton
( https://www.portbickertonlighthouse.ca/) where Fred was the lighthouse keeper until 1977.

On July 13 the Maritime Lighthouse Amateur Radio Group
( https://www.facebook.com/groups/MLARG/) will set up antennas and operate for approximately 48 hours. The activation is dedicated to Fred.

All amateurs are welcome to come and see or to operate. Further information can be obtained by contacting George (VY2GF).

 
   George Dewar - dewarg@bellaliant.net - vy2gf@rac.ca          
   57 Perth Stn. Rd, Cardigan RR6, Prince Edward Island, Canada, C0A 1G0                                       
   Location: New Perth, 35kms East of Charlottetown, N46 12.857 W62 41.645
   Amateur Radio Callsigns - VY2GF & VY2PLH  Grid - FN86PF61OJ  ITU - 9  CQ - 5
   Telephone - 902 838-3282 Skype - george.dewar   Facebook - george.dewar.7

From Dave VE9CB, Atlantic Director Radio Amateurs of Canada

Hello all:

A group of Radio Amateurs in Quebec is very concerned about an unlicensed person in Nicolet QC who has been causing deliberate interference to Radio Amateurs.  They have engaged ISED, who seized equipment from the miscreant, but ISED has laid no charges under the Radiocommunication Act.  This person has acquired more equipment and continues to interfere with Amateurs.   

The petitioners "are calling on the government to provide more support to the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada so that it can intervene more decisively in this matter."

I have no first-hand information on the matter, but I favor the objective of ISED having more resources to fulfill their spectrum enforcement responsibilities.

You can find the petition here:
I agreed 100%. We need for enforcement of radio interference.
Jim VE1JBL


From Jim VE1JBL Jun.9th:

Anyone who has purchased or will be purchasing a Yaesu System Fusion radio since the SMART symposium at the end of April please let Brad Ross VE1ZX know as he will be forwarding this info along to Cory Sickles WA3UVV at Yaesu USA.
Cory is very interested to find out after his presentation at SMART how many amateurs have purchased a Fusion radio. If he has had enough sales over this current year from the Maritimes he may be coming back to SMART 2019 to give another presentation. His class was very well attended but due to scheduling problems some members could not take in the complete class. If he comes back we will make sure no other class will be going on and everyone will be able to attend.
Again this is only for amateurs who have purchased Fusion Radios.
Thanks for reading and enjoy the summer.
 

From Ken VY2RU June 3rd.


The Internet of Digital Radio by Onno Benschopu VK6FLAB

The topic of how radio evolves and embraces available technology is one that describes the hobby itself. From spark-gap through AM, SSB and FM our community picked up or invented solutions to make communication possible. When the internet came along it too became a tool ripe for picking and in 1997 a connection between a radio and the internet was made with the Internet Radio Linking Project or IRLP when Dave VE7LTD, a student at the University of British Columbia, joined the UBC Amateur Radio Society. Using a radio, some hardware and a computer, you could send audio between radios across the internet.

Since then this field has exploded with D-STAR, Echolink, DMR, AllStar, Wires, CODEC2, System Fusion and Brandmeister.

At a glance they're all the same thing, radio + internet = joy.

Looking closer there are two distinct kinds of internet radio contraptions, those where the radio is digital and those where it's not. IRLP is an example of an analogue radio connecting to hardware that does the encoding into digital and transmission across the internet. At the other end the reverse process, decoding, happens and another analogue radio is used to hear the result. This encoding and decoding is done by a piece of software called a CODEC.

If we continue for a moment down the analogue path, Echolink, AllStar and Wires do similar things. In 2002 Echolink made its way onto the scene, similar to IRLP, but it didn't need any specialised hardware, any computer running the Echolink software could be used as both a client and a server, that is, you could use it to listen to Echolink, or you could use it to connect a radio to another Echolink computer.

AllStar, which started life in 2008 went a step further by making the linking completely separate. It uses the metaphor of a telephone exchange to connect nodes together, which is not surprising if you know that it's built on top of the open source telephone switching software Asterisk.

In 2012 or so, Yaesu introduced Wires which is much like Echolink and AllStar. There are servers with rooms, not unlike chat rooms, where you connect a node to and in turn your radio.

Blurring the lines between these technologies happened when you could build a computer that spoke both IRLP and Echolink at the same time. Now you can also add AllStar to that mix.

Essentially these systems do similar things. They manage switching differently, handle DTMF differently, use a different audio CODEC and handle authentication in a variety of ways, but essentially they're ways of connecting normal hand-held radios, generally FM, to each other via the internet using intermediary computers called nodes. Before you start sending angry letters, I know, there's more to it, but I've got more to tell.

While Dave was busy in Canada inventing IRLP back in the late 1990's, in Japan the Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications funded research, administered by the Japan Amateur Radio League into the digitisation of amateur radio. In 2001 that research resulted in what we know today as D-STAR. Two years later, ICOM started developing D-STAR hardware which resulted in actual physical radios less than a year later. Today you can get D-STAR hardware from ICOM, Kenwood and FlexRadio Systems.

Unlike the other technologies where the audio was converted at a central place, in D-STAR the audio is encoded in the radio and a digital signal is sent across the airwaves. That in turn means that the software that does the encoding, the CODEC, needs to be inside the radio. Since the information is digital right from the point of transmit, you can send other information, like GPS locations and messages along with the audio.

In 2005 DMR started life as a group of companies, now up to around 40, agreeing on some standards for digital audio in much the same way as D-STAR. Mostly in use by commercial users, DMR has the ability to have two users simultaneously on-air using alternate channels by having separate time slots for each channel, alternating between the two of them. They agreed to use the same CODEC to ensure compatibility. Formal interoperability testing has been happening since 2010, but because DMR allows manufacturers to build in extra features many brands cannot actually work together on the same network.

For many years D-STAR and DMR-MARC, the DMR Motorola Amateur Radio Club World Wide Network, were the main digital radio systems around in amateur radio. That changed in 2013 when Yaesu introduced System Fusion. It too made digital audio at the radio, but it added a wrinkle by making it possible to have both analogue and digital audio on the same repeater. Depending on how the repeater is configured, analogue and digital radios can coexist and communicate with each other.

The Wires system that Yaesu rolled out was upgraded in 2016, renamed to Wires X and now also incorporates digital information to allow the linking of their System Fusion repeaters.

In 2014 at the Ham Radio Exhibition in Friedrichshafen in Germany, Artem R3ABM planned to make an alternative master server for DMR+ and DMR-MARC and the result was a German wordplay which we know today as Brandmeister. It acts as a network for digital radios in much the same way as DMR, but it's run as an open alternative to the commercially available options made by Motorola and Hytera.

The story isn't complete without mentioning one other development, CODEC2. It started in 2008 when Bruce Perens K6BP contacted Jean-Marc Valin, famous for the SPEEX audio compressor and David Rowe VK5DGR about the proprietary and patented nature of low data use voice encoders such as those in use in D-STAR, DMR and System Fusion. David had already been working in this area a decade earlier and started writing code.

In 2012 during Linux Conference Australia, Jean-Marc and David spent some time together hacking and managed to make a 25% improvement and CODEC2 was well under way. Today CODEC2 forms the basis of several projects including FreeDV in software, the SM1000 FreeDV adaptor in hardware and the roadmap for the future of open and free digital voice is bright.

I should mention that this information is specifically brief to give you an overview of the landscape and hopefully I've not made too many glaring errors, but feel free to drop me a line if you do find a problem.

Digital radio and the internet, it's not just a single mode, a whole cloud of modes, and I haven't even started with WSPR, FT8 or JT65.

I'm Onno VK6FLAB

To listen to the podcast, visit the website: http://podcasts.itmaze.com.au/foundations/ and scroll to the bottom for the latest episode. You can also use your podcast tool of choice and search for my callsign, VK6FLAB, or you can read the book, look for my callsign on your local Amazon store, or visit my author page: http://amazon.com/author/owh

If you'd like to participate in discussion about the podcast or about amateur radio, you can visit the Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/foundations.itmaze

Feel free to get in touch directly via email: onno@itmaze.com.au, or follow on twitter: @VK6FLAB (http://twitter.com/vk6flab/)

If you'd like to join the weekly net for new and returning amateurs, check out the details at http://ftroop.vk6.net, the net runs every week on Saturday, from 00:00 to 01:00 UTC on Echolink, IRLP, AllStar Link and 2m FM via various repeaters.

From the Halifax ARC Website

The Halifax ARC has a very active SwapShop page for anyone interested in some good gear. There is also a Wanted Section. Here is the link. CLICK HERE
The club also continues to update the Maritime Callbook. Even though there is no new call book coming out in print they do update the book and it can now be found online. I have put a link to the MARITIME CALLBOOK on the homepage of this site.
If you have any change of information for the callbook (address, callsign, phone number) contact Bill Elliott VE1MR with the updates. ve1mr@rac.ca

Emergency Management Exemplary Service Award

Today in Ottawa, the first recipients of the #EmergencyManagement Exemplary Service Award were honoured at ceremony with federal, provincial and territorial Ministers: http://ow.ly/MJVE30kaFCY
Outstanding Contribution to Emergency Management

Allan K Thurber VE1RG (far right standing)


Mr. Thurber has been involved with New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization (NBEMO) and the ham amateur radio operators since 1973. For more than 45 years, Mr. Thurber has been an integral communicator during emergencies throughout the province of New Brunswick, such as the 2017 ice storm in the northeast of the province of New Brunswick. Mr. Thurber's leadership and organization skills enabled NBEMO to communicate with emergency services during the province-wide communications blackout in August 2017. Mr. Thurber's dedicated volunteerism has shown great commitment to enhancing emergency communications capacity in New Brunswick.

From YouTube May 21st

Tour Through The Swaps Tables At Hamvention 2018. It is setup day at Hamvention 2018. Larry Jacobs WA7ZBO took a trip out to the Swaps tables to meet some new friends.

From Peter VE1PS May 12th

Here’s a throw back link for the Maritime Amateur site.

 The basic operation of a Morse code telegraph is explained for transmitting messages using short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes".

https://youtu.be/xsDk5_bktFo

Sincerely,

N. Peter D. Service, BA

From Al VO1NO May 8th


Emergency Communications Course


 The Annapolis Valley ARC and Kings County ARC will conduct an Emergency Communications Course on Saturday, 2 June in the Kentville Volunteer Fire Department, 463 Main Street in Kentville.   The course will start at 0900, and continue into the afternoon after a break for lunch.


Topics to be covered include:
- Regional Emergency Management Organization;
- Incident Command System;
- Maritimes Repeater System;
- Basic Voice Procedure;
- Message Handling: and
- Net Procedures.


The course is available to everyone interested in assisting in time of emergency - you do not need to be a licensed Amateur Radio operator, or a member of either club. There is no cost to take part.

Those wishing to register for the course can contact me by e-mail: alphonsepenney@gmail.com


Al Penney

VO1NO

From Ken VY2RU May 6th,

Solar Panel QRM!!!  Read and take note guys...this is becoming a problem...here!!!!  If you have a problem with noise check your area for Solar Panel Arrays and see if they are emitting any spurious RF.  The following by Bob WB4APR and associated links will certainly give you some idea of what we are up against.   

- Ken   VY2RU


Threat to HF from Solar Panel change....

Friday, May 4, 2018

The creator of APRS Bob Bruninga WB4APR says "I don't want to be an alarmist, but we need the Hams with the proper knowledge to get involved in this disturbing news" 

His post on the AMSAT-BB, used with permission, says: 

The National Electric Code now requires electronics on every module of a solar array communicating via signalling on the DC power lines to assure EACH pair of panels can shut down independently. This is to make all possible faults never allow more than 80 volts anywhere in the system. This is effective 1 Jan 2019

This is the nail in the coffin of simple DC series string arrays which are the quietest systems and almost demands microinverters oroptimizers on every panel. Refer to the QST article a few years ago about how disastrous optimizers are to RFI and HF operations with modules all over the roof.

Here is the Solar news:
https://solarbuildermag.com/bos/nec-2017-module-level-solar-system-shutdown/

Also, what is going to happen to an array that has signaling all over it in the near field of HF?

Although you can avoid it by going solar before then, you may have problems when your neighbors go later.

I hate to be an alarmist but we all know what happens when ham radio and commercial systems are incompatible and even though Ham radio might be in the right, we are only 1 in 600 and no one is going to side with us.

We took on broadband over power and squelched that dumb idea, but now this has the potential for equal demise of Ham radio. It should be fixable, but we also know that there is high competition in the solar market and the modules that are made the cheapest will be popular and will likely not be adequately filtered.

If nothing else, we need to find out what systems are terrible emitters and nip them in the bud. Maybe all it takes is driving by solar systems you see and turing on your AM radio on a weak signal channel and seeing if the background noise peaks near that home. But also it has individual peaks, so it might also be nice to tune around too find the max and then check the range. I find the noise can go hundreds of feet along the power lines.

You can't miss em... just sounds like a 60 Hz buzz on all the harmonics of the inverter switching frequency.

Bob WB4APR

AMSAT Bulletin Board archive 
http://www.amsat.org/pipermail/amsat-bb/

Subscribe to the AMSAT-BB at 
http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb

From Matt VE1BSG May 1st,

Hi Everyone,

 

I wanted to pass on my congratulations and recognition to the Province’s newest set of licensed amateur radio operators!

 

Over the last four months this group has put in a great deal of effort and study both inside and outside the Province’s class, and has shown a great deal of interest in this hobby, which is also a great help to public safety during times of emergency. The examiners commented that both the interest and the diligence of the students was obvious when the final review occurred and the exam was written. We are proud to welcome this group into the amateur community, and know that their new privileges will be very useful in their roles as communicators and emergency management personnel.

 

Congratulations to you all!

 

In the attached photo, from left to right:

 

Scott Fisher – PSFC – Student

Al Cyples – PSFC – Course/Exam Assistant

Wanda Witcher – EMO Nova Scotia – Student

Nicole Benoit – PSFC – Student

Debra MacDonald – Student

Tosha Clarke – Student

George Mosdell – Student

Donna Harwood – Student

Karen Wickwire – Student

Paul Maynard – Student

Jim Hannon – Examiner

Brad Ross – Examiner

Mark Turner – Student

 

There is at least one additional student who was not able to write the exam yesterday, but we hope to arrange this in the near future.

 

Matthew Boyle

Manager of Field Operations

Public Safety and Field Communications

(902) 424-3479

Matthew.Boyle@novascotia.ca

From Rick VE9MTB Apr.19th


New Web Site Launched

At long last, we have refreshed our web site. It's still a "work in progress" but we're sure you will find it easier to navigate and keep up-to-date on IRG activities.   The new location will be https://ve9irg.net   so be sure to update your bookmarks.  Some content on the old site will still be available as we transition.  Any feedback is welcome, just look for the "Contact" link at the bottom of each page.  See the important information below about your user name and password for the new site!

Member information update

As part of the new web site, we have been updating the membership information.  No doubt, we have a lot of wrong e-mails, mispellings or wrong expiry dates with the change-over.  Take a look at the "Current Members" page on the new web site and if anything is incorrect, let us know using the "Contact" form at the bottom of each page.

Important:  Your old log-in and passwords are not valid on the new web site.  Current members seeking access to "members only" features on the new site will have to set a new password as a security feature.  Here's how:

  • Go to the Home Page and look for the  "User Login" box on the left.
  • Click on "Reset your password"
  • Enter your User name -- this has been set by default to be your call sign (i.e. ve9abc ) or the e-mail address that we have on file (the same one that you got this e-mail on).  Click "Submit".
  • Instructions will be sent to your e-mail on how to set your new password.
  • Once you log in, you can check and edit your personal information if you wish.
  • After that, you can log in at any time with your "User name" (usually your call sign) and your own "Password" that only you can set or change.
  • You do not need to log-in check your expiry date, or to renew your membership.
  •  

If you run into problems, send us a note here:  https://ve9irg.net/contact


Rick MacMillan  VE9MTB
President, IRG

From Dave VE1HUL Apr.16th

As of today April 13, 2018 at 0045 the new web page for the Truro Amateur Radio Club is online.
There are still some areas to add some more info to but we are essentially up and running.

If you have any questions or comments you can direct them to VE1HUL at ve1hul@rac.ca

From Jim VE1JBL Apr.11th

With the latest increase of users and digital radios here in Atlantic Canada I have added a couple of new links on the Homepage of the Maritime Amateur website. On the left hand side you will see "All things Digital" and "DMR NB on Facebook.
"All things Digital" directs you to Ron MacKay's website VE1AIC and to My DMR, Fusion, MMDVM Information page.
There is a wealth of information there going back several years but also includes the latest news and information and photos about digital radios, software and hot spots.
Ron will again this year have a display at S.M.A.R.T 2018 showing off all the digital modes, Hot Spots and will answer any questions you have on the mode.

The other new link is the DMR New Brunswick Facebook page @DMRNB. This covers all the latest news and information about DMR in New Brunswick.
For those of you that do not have Facebook (myself included) I have set up an email list where I will send out news and information to all that sign up (24) and counting. Let me know if you would like to be on this list.
The news will also be posted on the MA website and on the MA Twitter feed.

From Shane VE1SMC Apr.8th

Since the fall of 2017 some members of the Liverpool Fire Department expressed interest in taking a basic amateur radio course.
They approached Trevor Munroe VE1TKM who is the fire chief, and asked him if he could put one on for them, he agreed. He obtained training information from Honorary Firefighter Shane McDougall VE1SMC. On April 7th,  2018 the group sat down with Bill Corkum VA1BC the local examiner from the Queens County ARC along with assistance form Howard Henderson VE1FV, and 4 out of 5  member passed there amateur radio course.
Two of them obtained Basic with Honors. They are Devon Whynot VE1DXW and Chris Whynot VE1CLS. The other two that passed with Basic are Nicholas Whynot VE1NJW and Byron Thorburne VE1BET. Michael Peach will be rewriting his exam at a later date.
Best of luck to you and congratulations to our new ham radio operators, and enjoy this hobby we call Amateur Radio.

From Jim VE1JBL Apr.7th

With interest growing in the digital radio mode (D-Star, Fusion, DMR) for amateur radio the WestCumb ARC in Amherst NS is kicking around the idea of hosting a weekly Maritime DMR net. There are now well over one hundred DMR ID"s issued to Atlantic Canada amateurs but not much activity. This may be a good time to start up a net so amateurs will be able to learn and use these radios.
Not all amateurs are interested in DMR and some may not have the funds to purchase a radio yet but the prices have really come down in the past couple of years.
If interested in a weekly net please email me and let me know. You can also suggest a day and time to have a net. If you have questions, send them along.
There is also a poll on the Maritime Amateur Twitter feed @maritimeamateur where you can vote YES or NO to a weekly maritime net. This poll will be active for seven days.
As most of you know I like to promote the hobby the best I can. Saying that I have set up an email list for amateurs interested in digital radio in Atlantic Canada. I will share all the information I receive dealing with the mode including updates to repeaters and local nets as they come online. Send me an email letting me know you would like to be on this list and I will add you in.

From Dana VE1VOX

The Canadian Brandmeister DMR Network now has an established emergency communication talk group for NB, NS, PEI. 3021911 Maritime Canada Disaster.

https://wiki.brandmeister.network/index.php/Canada
 

From Jim VE1JBL

Just a note to let everyone know that on March 1st, it was the 10th anniversary of the Maritime Amateur website.
It started as a way to contact amateurs around the Maritimes after becoming Radio Amateur of Canada Section Manager for the Maritimes (2008-2012)
To all my friends who have helped me out during these 10 years with stories, Silent Key information and donations, thank you from the bottom of my heart.
Without all of you this site would not be possible.
I will continue to bring stories about amateur radio from Atlantic Canada to all of you for for enjoyment.
Quick stats after 10 years: TOTAL Visits - 113760, Monthly average - 948, Daily average - 31  

 

From Dave VE9CB

Starting on 1 May, Fredericton ARC will run its first Advanced Certificate Course.  

Here are the key features:

Cost: $75.  This includes:
- the 2nd Edition Canadian Amateur Radio Advanced Qualification Study Guide (Spring 2017) from Coax Publications and
- the costs of the examination. 
If you already have a copy of the Advanced Study Guide, your cost will be only $25.  You are responsible to provide pen, paper and a receptive frame of mind.

Registration: Due date: Monday 9 April.  Either send me an Interac E-Transfer (to ve9cb@rac.ca) or bring cash or a cheque payable to FARC to the Monday 9 April meeting of FARC .  I will order the required study guides that evening after the meeting.  

Classes: All classes will be in the Boardroom of the Victoria Health Centre, 65 Brunswick Street, Fredericton from 7pm to 9.30pm on the following dates:
Tuesday 1 May 
Monday 7 May 
Thursday 10 May 
Tuesday 15 May 
Thursday 17 May 
Monday 21 May (Note: Victoria Day) 
Thursday 24 May
Tuesday 29 May
Thursday 31 May
Monday 4 June
Tuesday 12 June 
Thursday 14 June - ADVANCED EXAMINATION by Art VE9BP

Please circulate this to anyone who you think might be interested in joining the course.

Please let me know if you have any questions.  

73,

Dave VE9CB  ve9cb@rac.ca
FARC Training Coordinator

From the February HARC Reflector

President’s Report:
Brian reported that HRM has made the Club an offer to occupy two rooms on the upper floor of the Hammond Plains Fire Station #50 and HARC has accepted.
There will have to be a few upgrades made to the facility before we can take occupancy. There is also a large meeting room that we can book that will hold upwards of 40 people and will work for our monthly meeting.
There is a smaller room that is also bookable and will work for smallgroup meetings such as the Executive and our Basic Course.
Not having to rent our current monthly meeting room, will save the Club significant money. The plan is to move our tower from St. Andrews and put it up as a 56-foot tower with a beam and other antennae at the new location.
The actual move-in date is yet to be determined.

From Dave VE1ADH Jan.29th, 2018

The AM net was started in the 1960's or 70's by my mentor Tex Mattinson VE1AAX.  He had been forced off of AM operation in the 50's because his AM transmitter caused TV I due to poor shielding. He acquired a better transmitter but SSB was becoming the phone mode and AM carriers were not really welcome on the band's. He eventually acquired a SSB rig but him and some of his buddy's wanted to use AM because they liked the quality. Tex often referred to AM as "Angel music". So they started the net. I used to listen to the net before I was licensed and I even called in on CW after I got my ticket. My first HF phone contact was on the AM net in July 1988, just after passing my advanced. I had been CW only since 1967. 
Tex became a silent key in 1993 and I was asked to be net control and have been doing so, with help from others, since.
I was asked one time if I would send in a traffic report for the net but it was not a traffic net so we started referring to it as a round-table.  This is appropriate as back when AM was king most of the rigs did not have PTT and round-table QSOs were the norm.
The net usually starts around 8:30 local Sunday mornings on 3735. Anyone is welcome and most of the discussion revolves around old gear and technical topics.

From Gary VA1GGM Jan.26th, 2018

Hello:


My name is Gary Murphy VA1GGM and I have been handed the Canwarn coordinator torch from Jim Langille. 

I have spent the last 20 years working as a Nova Scotia Paramedic and also 20 years working in the NS Medical Communications Center as a Paramedic Communications Officer.  I have been a Radio Amateur for about 5 years. (I am still learning an awful lot about ham radio and welcome all hints and tips. Please feel very free to help me in this endeavor.)

I have also taken most of the FEMA independent Study courses, COMET courses, SkyWarn courses , ARRL, ARES, RAC, and EMO courses. I heartily endorse taking all the courses that are available I will be highlighting any free courses for anyone with the interest and time to take them.

I want to thank all those spotters who have put the time in over the years with Jim and hope you will help me continue to make this a worthwhile resource for Environment Canada. Also tank you to the Net Controllers who have helped over the years. If anyone wishes to take on that role as well; I am hoping to get a net controller course for us.

I have started a Facebook page to keep us together as well.


Please send me your ideas and suggestions so that we, together, can make this a great resource


Gary Murphy VA1GGM

From the IRG Website

Hospital Radio System Exercise Great Success!

A test exercise of the New Brunswick health facility radio system that took place on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 was a great success.

Net control was VE9DOH at Department of Health, Fredericton, headed by Al Thurber CG1RG contacted each health care facility.  Operators at each facility reported those present and the equipment being used, and any particular comments on accessibility to the radio or the facility for the test.  Over forty five (45) operators took part at twenty-one (21) facilities.

The test was a good demonstration to served agencies that amateur radio can be used as a back-up network in case of communication failures such as those experienced on August 4, 2017 when many cellular and internet connections were disrupted in the Maritimes.

The International Repeater Group maintains agreements with the Department of Health, and the Horizon and Vitalité Health Networks to assist with emergency communications.  Each health care facility with an emergency room is equipped with an amateur radio as back-up.